Brought to you by the letter \S/

magenmagenmagen:

wyattsalazar:

the “you live with your parents” insult is really flaccid because a metric shitton of cultures don’t see “leave the house forever” as some grandiose moment of liberation that’s so important to the development of a person that it has to happen as fast as possible. until i came to the USA i didn’t know a single person who was pressured by their parents to leave the house because they’re “too old to stay there” or whatever. in puerto rico it is really common to stay with your parents until they and you are both stable enough that you can leave. whaddaya know, there are cultures that don’t place a stigma on being poor or wanting to care for your family or needing your family to care for you for some other reason.

I’ve told people this for years: “Leaving the nest” when you’re 18, assuming it’s under safe and healthy circumstances, is a distinctively white middle class American ideal that doesn’t apply to much of the world, let alone much of America. If you have the chance to leave home of your own volition with the ability to support yourself, great, but most people don’t. We just don’t.

"Smallville: Chaos" concludes today - WHAT’S NEXT?

bryanqmiller:

Starting next week, an arc unfolds that includes the following within its many panels and pages:

image

No, for serious. It does, and she does. See, it comes up later, too:

image

Lois wouldn’t lie! Not on paper!

prongsmydeer:

Harry Potter AU where someone sees Harry in his cousin’s over-sized clothing with his underfed body and hears him casually mention the cupboard in which he sleeps and calls the fucking police

dracophile:

mydollyaviana:

The musical number "Paris Holds the Key (To Your Heart)" includes cameos by various historical characters from the time including Maurice Chevalier, Sigmund Freud, Charles A. Lindbergh, Josephine Baker, Claude Monet, Isadora Duncan, Auguste Rodin, and Gertrude Stein.

I’d like to point out Freud slips on that banana peel.

A Freudian slip.

image

akaili:

Aug 20, 2014 | New York | Protesters march across the Brooklyn Bridge in solidarity with Palestine and hang a banner with the Palestinian flag and the words “Gaza in our hearts; Boycott, Divest, Sanction Israel.”

Photographs by Anwar Alomaisi

yahoonewsphotos:

The peaceful side of the Ferguson protests

Nightly chaos in the St. Louis suburb is getting all the attention, but the vast majority of those protesting have been peaceful. Here’s a look at the some of the moments that are not making the front pages. (Yahoo News)

(Photos by REUTERS/Mark Kauzlarich, REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni, Scott Olson/Getty Images, AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

See more images of the peaceful side  and our other slideshows on Yahoo News!

#hit them with your fastball girl 
prokopetz:

grrspit:

nessanotarized:

nativefemboy:

thartist72:

“In 2002, having spent more than three years in one residence for the first time in my life, I got called for jury duty. I show up on time, ready to serve. When we get to the voir dire, the lawyer says to me, “I see you’re an astrophysicist. What’s that?” I answer, “Astrophysics is the laws of physics, applied to the universe—the Big Bang, black holes, that sort of thing.” Then he asks, “What do you teach at Princeton?” and I say, “I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street. A few years later, jury duty again. The judge states that the defendant is charged with possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine. It was found on his body, he was arrested, and he is now on trial. This time, after the Q&A is over, the judge asks us whether there are any questions we’d like to ask the court, and I say, “Yes, Your Honor. Why did you say he was in possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine? That equals 1.7 grams. The ‘thousand’ cancels with the ‘milli-’ and you get 1.7 grams, which is less than the weight of a dime.” Again I’m out on the street.”

powerful Black Science Man

Exactly.

“I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.
This is a good illustration of what’s wrong with the US criminal justice system.

I’m more struck by the second anecdote, in which he was evidently disqualified from jury duty for displaying the ability to do math.

prokopetz:

grrspit:

nessanotarized:

nativefemboy:

thartist72:

“In 2002, having spent more than three years in one residence for the first time in my life, I got called for jury duty. I show up on time, ready to serve. When we get to the voir dire, the lawyer says to me, “I see you’re an astrophysicist. What’s that?” I answer, “Astrophysics is the laws of physics, applied to the universe—the Big Bang, black holes, that sort of thing.” Then he asks, “What do you teach at Princeton?” and I say, “I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.

A few years later, jury duty again. The judge states that the defendant is charged with possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine. It was found on his body, he was arrested, and he is now on trial. This time, after the Q&A is over, the judge asks us whether there are any questions we’d like to ask the court, and I say, “Yes, Your Honor. Why did you say he was in possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine? That equals 1.7 grams. The ‘thousand’ cancels with the ‘milli-’ and you get 1.7 grams, which is less than the weight of a dime.” Again I’m out on the street.”

powerful Black Science Man

Exactly.

“I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.

This is a good illustration of what’s wrong with the US criminal justice system.

I’m more struck by the second anecdote, in which he was evidently disqualified from jury duty for displaying the ability to do math.